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THE DISTRESS IN JAMAICA AMONGST…

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THE DISTRESS IN JAMAICA AMONGST THE COLOURED RACES. The following letter appeared in the Times of July4tn:â Sir.âThe most reoent and reliable information from Jamaica leaves no doubt in the minds of the well- wishers to the colony that, as far as regards the negro and coloured population, a state of hoplessncsa and distress prevails. This is not to be wondered at when the sad and suffering condition of these poor people is borne in mind. From the report of her Majestjs Commissioners, it appears that at l0aBt MOO houses belonging to the negroes have been wantonly de- stroyed. According to the evidence of Mr. Parry, the Government surveyor, the property thus sacrificed is worth not less than £ 4,000. This estimate, however, does not include the mills and minor buildings. Nor does it include the furniture and clothing consumed or otherwise destroyed. The distress consequent upon this reckless destruction of property it is painful to contemplate. It is estimated that not less than 5,000 persons, principally women and children, are at the present time homeless. They are 1 ⢠⢠lu nr in tomriorarv sheds, in vast numbers of instances deprived by the hand of violence and cruelty of their natural protectors. The Colonial Government is prostrate, and has probably not ability to aid these forlorn and suffering people. Our duty at the present time seems to be in the first is stance to provide shelter for these poor outcasts, and after- wards to take measures for their social, educational, and moral improvement. The British and Foreign Freedman's Aid Society is prepared to undertake this important work. Already it has opened up a corre- spondence with Jamaica, and a number of clergymen, ministers, and gentlemen of the first respectability are prepared to co-operate with the London society. &. J.1-- A gentleman writing to us from Jamaica on tne 23rd of May, say a,â"Since the receipt of your letter dated the 8th inst., I have written to Mr. intimating my willingness to co-operate in any measures for the carrying out, of the Britieh and Foreign Freedman s Aid Society. By idea of working the thing is. to form antral tee at Kingston, -with branch committees Bay, Blue Mountain Yalley, at Bath, and ^anc 10- neal. I have discovered many real cases of loss and unrighteous suffering." Speaking of the district whence the letter was written, the writer says: To give a general view of things here I may tell you that tlwa are some 200 houses in this district burnt. One hundred may be put down as destroyed oy lJlllj .J:\jUö,- lessness of soldiers and pseudo^volunteers under Mr. their brave lieutenant.' The writer then speaks of the hardships, loss, and impoverishment of the people, and sa.ys, "General and great is the distress brought on by our recent troubles. _He concludes £ â r-n^ncf Hnarsrestions :â lhat aid be given â 1. For tbe_ immediate relief of hunger, nakedness, and destitution. 2. Pecuniary or material help to those who are desirous of re- building their homes. 3. Aid in building or repairing mills, school-rooms, and places of worship, &o. 4. A fund for the formation of primary schools in villages remote from the central schools." The writer further sava: The' Frienda' gave me £ 50, and I got £ '20 from £ 70 I have been enabled to distribute already, but to feed, to clothe, to aid in pro- viding a temporary hut, what was that among so many ? My humble prayer is that, great as have been our troubles, greater may be the good stimulated by the Supreme wisdom and power." It would be easy to present touching cases of dis- tress, but this cannot be needed. The report of her Majesty's Commissioners-" That the punishments inflicted were excessive; 1. That the punishment of iI"t.1, wan linnfloessarilv frequent: 2. That the nog- sicga were reckless, and at Bath positively barbareus; 3. That the burning of 1,000 houses was wanton and cruel; "âtogether with the minutes of evidence, is sufficiently thrilling to afford a. sufficient justifica- tion for my appealing with confidence to the sym- pathy and support of the generous British public. I shall be glad to receive the donations of those who are willing to come to the aid of these suffering and perish- ing people, or donations may be paid in to Messrs. Barclay, Bevan, Tritton, and Co., bankers, 54, Lam- bard-street, to the account of the British and Foreign Freedmen's Aid Society, or sent to the Secretary, 102, Fleet-street, E.C. I am, yours faithfully, ALFRED S. CHURCHILL, President of the British and Foreign Freedmen's Aid Society. 16, Rutland-gate, S.W., July 3.

BRUTAL MURDER IN STAFFORDSHIRE.

FALLING IN OF THE ROOF OF…

TWO YOUNG BEGINNERS IN CRIME.I

HOOTINGS FROM THE" OWL." ^j\

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MR. GLADSTONE AND THE WORKING…

A YOUNG LADY'S LARKS.

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THE JAMAICA COMMITTEE.

THE RAILWAY AND THE LONDON…

... IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. ..

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POLICY OF FRANOE IN THE WAR.