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A BAMBLEB'S JOTTINGS.

ALARMING FIRE AT A PENITENTIARY.

THE GREAT FIRES ON TEE YORK-…

[No title]

THE COLLIERS' STRIKE IN SOUTH…

M. FAZY AND THE RIOTS INI…

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M. FAZY AND THE RIOTS IN GENEVA, M. James Fazy having been summoned before the Federal examining magistrate of Geneva to be interro- gated, has addressed the following letter to that functionary;- Sir,-You have summoned me to be examined in an inquiry which has been opened on the subject of the events of.the 22nd ult. I am not aware whether it is as a witness or on personal facts that you have wished to interrogate me. If it is on the latter, I will tell you that, although I consider the taking up of arms at St. Gervais fully justified by what had taken place at the Hotel-de-Ville, I have not to answer for it, as I had nothing to do in the affair. I was at home at half-past two, when a message arrived from the Nation Suisse begging- me to call at the office, and I went there. As is the case at the office of every journal, particularly at the moment of im- portant events, a number of persons came in. All were alarmed at what was going on at the Hotel-de-Ville, whence the worst accounts were every moment being received as to the pressure which the opposite party exercised on the Council of State by keeping it prisoner. Every one agreed that a means must be found of delivering it, but not a word was said by me or by any one in my presence of takulg up arms. The number of visitors soon diminished, and we re- mained with only the editorial staff, and the persons em- ployed in the printing office. We had a number composed which can attest our ignorance of what was 41 to take place. The office of the journal is situated in the Eastern Pavilion of the Entrepot, and the windows loot into the Bue Pecolat. From them neither the Bue du Mont Blanc nor the Rue Chantepoulet can be seen. We were there- fore without any connection with those streets where the events took place, and we only know of them by the noise of the firing. We thought it came from La Ficelle, and we closed our doors. None of us were aware that the citizens of the faubourg had gone to procure arms at the Arsenaldu Grand Pre. Some time after the firing, which took place at half-past four, had ceasecl, I left to go to the Theatre des Varietes, which is opposite, and where I found the unfortunate Jacob, who had been wounded before the firing began by the band of La Ficelle. I was so little ac- quainted with passing events, that I thought that La Ficelle had possession of the neighbouring street, and I took pre- cautions to reach my house, Ci"OssÃ1lg to the theatre and the interior of the square. I was much surprised on getting home to find an armed post there and a cannon planted on the hric1gl;). Some armed citizens requested me to allow them to enter my house, but I refused. From that moment I did not again go out until the following day, when I was several times threatened and insulted by persons belonging to the party opposed to me. I consider as false any deposition which is in contradiction to what I have just had the honour to state to you. I think, sir, you will receive these, expla- nations as sufficient as far as 1 am concerned. I have the honour to salute you with the consideration which is youi due. JAMES FAZY.

A SELF-ACCUSED ACCOMPLICE…

THE RIOTS IN ~B ELF A S T.

STATIONS OF THE BRITISH ARMY.

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