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- A'I'j.PTE D nUSL IN NEWCASTLE.…

EARL RUSSELL ON EDUCATION.

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EARL RUSSELL ON EDUCATION. On Monday afternoon, the annual meeting of the British and Foreign School Society was held at the Training School, Borough Road, London; Earl Russell presiding. The adoption of the report, and resolutions re- affirming the principles of the society, recognising tli e efforts made to extend them in Wales, and thank- ing the Queen for her patronage and support were spoken to by the Rev. Thomas Binnev, Mr. Pease, M.P., Mr. C. Buxton, M.P., Lord Lyveden, Mr. E. B inies, M.P., the Rov. Donald Fraser, Mr. Sartori-, M.P., Mr. Vernon Harcourt, M.P., and Dr. Hugh Allen. Lord Lyveden expressed the opinion that the Education Bill would easily pass the Lords when it reached that House. Mr. Harcourt denied that it was any part of the plan of the League to exclude religious instruction of an unsectarian character from public schools. Earl Russell, in the course of a long speech, said it was necessary now to refer to the first principles of the societ-, which were, that religion should he introduced into teaching, that the Bible should be the foundation of the religious teaching, and that no use should e made of catechisms and formu- laries. He believed education to be incomplete without religion, and to show the imperfection of the Church Catechism he quoted the terms in which it conveved the lesson of forgiveness, so often in- culea'ed in the Scripture3, from the story of Joseph to the Lord's Praver, insisting that the terms I pra unto God that He would send all things need- ful both for our souls and bodies, and that He woull he merciful to us a-d forgive us our sins," were net so simple and intelligible as the sentences of the Lord's Prayer. This illustrated the reason why he wished to separate B blical lessons from all cate- chisms, tinged as they were with the passions of the times in which they were written. Whatever might be done, he trusted the society would in no way depart from these principles. He referred to f school established at Faversham by clergymen and Dissenters, the rule of which was that the Catechism chould be taught, but not to children whoseparents obiected. It was a good rule, but in practice the i renting parents did not object. Their hardship, however, was still considerable; because the ques- tion for them was whether their children should re- ceive this instruction or be sent away from the school. In providing a system of national educa- tion, the first thing to be done was to divide the country into convenient districts; the second was to take care that no rate or tax should be imposed upon the people to which they or their representa- tives had not given their consent; and the third was that the education should be religious but un- pectarian; and he should test the bill by these three considerations. It might be, as Lord Lyve- den had said, that any bill sent up from the Com- mons would readily pass the Lords but it was open to a peer to protest, and if the bill gave permanence and perpetuity to sectarian education, he should protest against it. He trusted no such calamity would happen, and he felt confident it would not. If we continued denominational education in England, we must comply with the demand of the Roman Catholic bishopsforthe continuance of denominational educa- tion in Ireland and that would involve the exclusion of 24,000 Protestant, children from the chools of I-land, which it would be a sad thing for the House of Commons to assent to, for these children must be driven either out of the schools or into the Roman Catholic Church. The Church of England was not now the same Church it had been in past times. There were those who were trying to assimilate tho practices and ceremonies of the Church of England, to the Church of Rome and if we were to establish the denominational teaching of the Church of Eng- land, we could not be quite sure what the character of it would be in 20 or 30 years. In the novel called "Foul Play," a sound ship coming from Australia was scuttled by men drilling holes through the bottom, and he could not help thinking sometimes that there was a gimlet at work in the hold of the Church of England. He trusted that the attempt to scuttle the ship would be defeated; but it be- hoved all to be watchful, and to take care that this Protestant country maintained its Protestant Bible, its Protestant teaching, and its Protestant schools.

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