ο»Ώ [No title]|1868-02-21|The Pembrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser - Welsh Newspapers Online
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rRIAL AND SENTENCE OF PATRICK…

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THE ABYSSINIAN EXPEDITION.

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« DESTRUCTION or ARTILLERY STORES AT UTRECHT,— The artillery stores in Utrecht have been reduced to ashes, The loss is estimated at 200,000 florins. THE BEER AND SPIRIT TRADES.—According to a par- limantary return the number of licences taken out in the United Kingdom for the financial year 1865-66, by dealers In spirits, wine, maltsters, brewers, publicans, beer-shop keepers, and other retailers of beer was 340,000. PEACE AND WAR.—From the report of the United States Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, just issued, it appears that, on board the vessels in the navy of the United States engaged in suppressing the rebel- lion, from April, 1861, to June, 1865, the total number of sailors treated was 144,068, of whom 2533 or '011& died, or rather less in proportion during the years of war than during the years of peace.—British Medical Journal. SUPPOSED Loss OF A BALTIC STFAMBB The screw steamer Smyrna, of Hull,|commanded by Capt N. Hreissel, and belonging to Messrs Sahlgreen and Currall, of Lon- don and Hull,is supposed to have been lost in the gales of last week. The steamer sailed from Dantzic, bound for London, with a cargo of wheat, on Sunday, the 26th of January, and put into Christiansand on Sunday, the 2nd February, for a supply of coals and to await more favourable weather. She proceeded from that port the following Wednesday, and has not arrived in port, although two sieanlers which left Christiansand three days after her have reached across, the one having ar- rived in Hull and the other in London, on Monday last, without having 'seen anything of the missing boat. The owners on Friday received a telegram, stating a boat marked 'Smyrna, of Hull,' a steamer's batch, with wheat attached, and several letters, addressed to Captain Hreissel, had washed ashore near the Scaw. There is reason, therefore, to fear the steamer has foundered during the severe hurricane which raged in the North Sea the latter part of the last week. No tidings have been received of the safety of the crew. FALL OF A RAILWAY TUNNEL.—An accident of a serious character, but unfortunately unattended by loss of life, happened on Wednesday on the Knighton and Central Wales branch of the London and North-Western Railway. This line extends from the Craven Arms to Llanwrtyd, and in a distance of a little over 48 miles passes under three tunnels. For the last two months a gang of men has been engaged at every favourable op- portunity in casing with brick the tunnel near Llan- gwello Station, a costly work undertaken by the com- pany as a means of giving additional strength to the arches, and more as a matter of precaution than of neces- sity. On Wednesday, however, the precaution was jus- tified by the sudden collapse of a portion of the tunnel at the Knighton end, which had not yet been reached by the workmon. The last train through had passed in safety some hours previously, and none of the workmen or officials being about no fatality resulted. The line was of course completely blocked up. and for some time all traffic was stopped, but in the course of the day ar- rangements were made whereby the ordinary traffic was resumed, trains running up to either terminus of the tunnel, and the passengers walking across and joining the train in waiting on the other side. The tunnel is nearly ihfoc-quarters of a mile in length, and was con- structed about four years ago. j HomE.-How is it the word home is losing something of its pristine pharm ? Whence come that restless long- ing for something new, and that impatience under parental government, which threatens us with the loss of much that has been enjoyed by our forefathers? The I luxury and insubordination of the rising generation are everywhere complained of. As to the first, we see per- sons in the middle rank of life dressing like those in a higher station, and assuming their tcineq and thom in still lower sphere aim at the relative standing of the middle classes- walking, talking, and dressing, in a way thatl,leaves it doubtful what they are. This inordinate love of dress, and this unbecoming style, are breaking down the moral barriers of many of our homes. The attractive dress of some females in the humbler walks of life leads them into temptation, being observed by the libertine, and making him excuse himself for an in- fringement upon purity and virtuo. Then again, every one is complaining of the young assuming a tone and manner towards their elders most unbecoming; looking upon them as a past generation, only useful as providers and caterers for their amusement. Parents have lost the reins of home-government, and allow their children to live most luxuriously without reference to expense, whilst they themselves work and economize, their economy meanwhile being estimated by the young as the result of the inferior tastes of the generation that is passing away. These things are no wonder, however, if parents allow it to be so. They are no wonder if mothers who love their daughters, display them instead of pro- tecting them and teaching them that their best safeguard is in a modest, consistent atilre, and in contentment with the place they are intended to occupy in the world. These things are no wonder, if parents do not teach their children their position; if they do not let them understand tbat they, as parents, are the beads and sup- porters of their households, their guides aim g-tardians; whose duty it is to rule with-love and wisdom, while it i« their children's to obey with aflectionato submission; indebted as they are to them. under God, for everything that is likely to further their interests in the world. At the same time parents must be most careful that their own example be in all things consistent. Evory home that is at ail worth the name nas its family altar, where the biessiog of a heavenly Father is daily sought. This is the mightiest influence for good, tending to bind a family together by a tie ¡bat nothing but death can ékvcr; often drawing its inemhers, alter they have been separated in the woi Id, back to home influences that will produce otfects through eternity.

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THE LONDON MARKETS. β– β– …

SOUTH WALES RAILWAY TIME TABjjj…

MILFORD BRANCH LINE OF RAJL^*

PEMBROKE AND TENBY RAILWAY

ORDERS FOR NEWSPAPERS AND…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.β€”FRIDAY.

.. THE ALLEGED ATTEMPT TO…

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THE ALABAMA CLAIMS.

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THE LATE MR W. HERAPATH.

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