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rRIAL AND SENTENCE OF PATRICK…

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THE ABYSSINIAN EXPEDITION.

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-âââââââ- THE LORD'S PRAYER BY AN ACTOR. l&lwih Booth, the celebrated tragedian, was a man who threw into his impersonations an amount of heart and soul, whteii his originals could scarcely have equal- led. He did Kictttrd HI., to the life and more. He had made human passioM" emotions, and experiences his life's study. He could mt only act, but feel, rage, love, despair, hate, ambition, fn?y, hope, and revenge with a depth and force that half amazcd his- auditors. He could transmute himself into the hero of his impersonation, and be could breathe a power into M'ber men's written words which perhaps was never surpassed. And what is remarkable, when he was inclined to give illustrations of this faculty to private circles of friend?,- he nearly always selected some passages from Job, Da rid, or Isaiah, or other holy men of old. When an aspiring yoaag man of Harvard University went to him by night to atilt a little advice or instruction in qualifying himself for an auditor, the veteran tragedian opened the Bible and readt a few verms from Isaiah in a way that made the Cam- bridge scholar tremble with awe, as if the prophet had risen from the dead and were uttering his sublime visions in his ears. He was then residing in Baltimore, and a piotfsJ1, urbane old gentleman of the city, hearing of his wouderfut power of elocution, one day invited him to dinner; ah&ough strongly deprecating the stage and all theatrical performances. A large company sat down to the table, and oa returning to the drawing room,*one of them requested Booth, as a special favour to them all, to repeat the Lord's Prayer. He signified his willingness to gratify them, and all eyes were fixed upon him. He slowly and reventially arose from his chair, trembling with the burden of two great conceptions. He bad to realise the character, attributes, and presence of the Almighty Being he was to address. He was to transform himself into a poor, sinning, stumbling, benighted, needy In suppliant, offering homage, asking bread, pardon, light, and guidance. Says one of the company present: It was wonderful to watch the play of emotions that con- volaed his countenance. He became deathly pale, and his eyes turned tremblingly upwards, were wet with tears; As yet he had not spoken. The silence could be felt; it had become absolutely painful, until at last the spell was broken as if by an electric shock, as his rish- toned voice, from white lips, syllabled forth 4 Our Father, which art in Heaven, &e. with a pathos and fervii solemnity that thrilled all hearts. He finished, the silence continued; not a Toiee was heard nor a muscle moved in his rapt audience, until, from a remote corner of the room, a subdued sob was heard, and the old gen- tleman (the host) stepped forward with streaming eyes and tottering frame, and seized Booth by the hand. I Sir, said he, in broken accents, 'you have afforded me a pleasure Ifor which my future life will feel grateful. I am an old man, and every day from boyhood to the present time I thought I had repeatel the Lord's Prayer; but I never heard it before, never!' You are right,' replied Beoth; to read that prayer as it should be read caused me the severest study and labour for thirty years, and I am far from being satisfied with the rendering of that wonderful production.âFireside Words for January by Elihu Burritt.

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THE LONDON MARKETS. ■■…

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MILFORD BRANCH LINE OF RAJL^*

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HOUSE OF COMMONS.—FRIDAY.

.. THE ALLEGED ATTEMPT TO…

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THE ALABAMA CLAIMS.

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THE LATE MR W. HERAPATH.

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