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©ur Jonhon (Kormpimknt.

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Jonhon (Kormpimknt. --We deem it righj; to state that we do not at aK times i lentify ourselves with our correspondent's opinions.) A few more days, and Parliament will have recom- menced its labours and perhaps it will generally be admitted that our position and prospects just now, ⢠although still rather gloomy, are brighter than they were a few weeks ago. Trade has somewhat revived, and the distress amongst the poor has diminished. Fenianism, though not yet stamped out, is less demon. strative than before, and the Fenians are so rapidly betraying one another that they must all begin to see that Fenianism is a hopeless game. Looking abroad there is nothing very disquieting to be seen on the horizon. France, it is true, is making gigantic rfforts for the increase of her army, and intends to "reform the war materiel and the fleet," but she evidently has no intention of going to war, unless forced to do so, or the public loan, which has been so much talked of, would not be spread over a period of twenty months. The Alabama claims may cause some little ill-feeling between this country and America, but after all it is only ill-feeling on paper, and will probably spend itself in diplomatic corres- pondence. Without entering deeply into purely political matters, it may be stated that Ministers will commence the Parliamentary campaign SBSb a fc"1" araount of public confidence and a toleratjfiSjrflance of success. It is rumoured that Governme»fe>_intend, if possible, to take the wind out of theSBtils of the Opposition, by bringing in an Educajpm-Bill and whether this be true or not it is certaii^ttat not many weeks of parliamentary business w passed without some effort in this direction. May the result be mutual forbearance and ultimate co-operation, so that the people may have the opportunity of educating their children An attempt will be made next Session to amend the present permissive, and therefore inoperative law on the adulteration of food, &c. A bill has been pre- pared by a member of the Royal College of Surgeons, and will be introduced by Mr. G. Dixon. The first clause provides that Every person who shall admix and every person who shall any other person or persons to admix, with any article of food or drink any injurious or poisonous ingredient or material to adulterate the same for sale; and every person who shall order any other person or persons to admix any ingredient or material with any drug to adulterate the same for sale, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and be imprisoned for six ealendarmonths with hard labour.' This will not in any way remedy the great evil of adulterating ordinary articles of food, which at present are not mixed with "injurious or poisonous" ingredients. Bone dust in bread, chicory in coSee, and a thousand other materials for adulterating food and drink, are not either injurious or poisonous, but they are simply cheap, and it is because they are cheap that they are used. So far as drugs are concerned, the proposed bill may be of benefit, but as to ordinary articles of consumption, the difficulty to know what to eat, drink, and avoid," will be as great as ever. The proposed compulsory appointment of analysts is also a good step; and a very good clause is that which provides for power to local authorities to direct inspectors of nuisances, tcc., to procure samples of food, &c., and, if they are found adulterated, to initiate proceedings; but still something more than permissive power is required. Another good clause is that which provides that any purchaser of an article may take it to an analyst, who shall give a certificate, and if this is condemnatory, the certificate shall be evidence before a justice, and the 5s. paid for it shall be part of the costs. Perhaps with our present wide-spread prejudice against all Parliamentary interference with "the freedom of trade," we cannot expect a stronger bill than this to have a chance of passing, and even this would be a great advance on the present weak, permissive, and inoperative measure. The public will ere long have the opportunity of reading the second volume of the Life of the Prince Consort," written chiefly by her Majesty, and under the editorship of Mr. Theodore Martin. The sheets are now, I believe, passing through the press, but the progress of the work has been retarded by Mr. Martin's illness, consequent on an accident. The sale of the Queen's "journal" has been so large, that it is whispered that her Majesty has naturally been affected by the charms of successful authorship, and is anxious to enjoy a continuance of its honours. Great interest is manifested in the approaching dis- cussion between Mr. Gladstone and the representatives of trades unionism. It is to take place on the 18th, and it has been arranged that the arguments shall be classified thus The limitation of apprentices; the minimum standard of wages piece-work and over- time the alleged action of trades unions in driving trade to foreign countries; and the practical advan- tages of trades unions. A delegate will speak to each of these points, each one of which is of no little moment to working men, and all of which combined make up a subject literally of vital importance. It is to be hoped that arrangements will be made so as to give a full report of the entire discussion. Mr. Gladstone is known to hold opinions on some points which are opposed to those of the union men, though on the advisability of trades unions existing, provided they are fairly managed, there is no dispute between the two. Here, however, comes the difficulty â what is fair management, and how far have tmdes unions the right to coerce mas- ters or men ? By the way, I wonder whether the subject of trades union outrages will be discussed. Perhaps not, as both parties would equally condemn them though there must be a difference of opinion as to how they are caused, and how they are to be avoided in future. At all events, it seems difficult to have a discussion on trades unions and entirely omit any debate on trades union outrages. The report of the commission appointed to inquire into them at Sheffield shows that out of sixty societies no less than twelve promoted or encouraged these outrages. That is a startling fact which it is not easy to ignore. Mr. George Francis Train has of late done a good deal to make himself look ridiculous. His pompous protest against his arrest, for instance, is laughable, and his claim for the trifling sum of £ 100,000âthough the arrest was perhaps just what he wantedâis so stupidly extravagant that not even he could have meant it. But as. if his efforts to make himself a laughing-stock were not enough, some of his zealous admirers come in to his aid. After one of his lectures in Cork, a pair of green silk garters was given him by some ladies, or, as they facetiously call themselves, a few unworthy twigs of the great treeâwomankind." These unworthy twigs say they have no gems to offer him, which is more to be lamented for their sake than for his, and they remark:â They'd worthless be to thee Who sways the mighty multitude Of hearts, so bold and free. Thee who sways may be pardonable Irish, but it is not English. But why should gems be worthless to Mr. Train ? He knows the value of money as well as most people, and gems are money. But the unworthy twigs proceed to say thatâ Old Ireland's sons that nightly throng To worship at thy shrine, Are gems more pure, than e'er were got From out Golconda's mine. I would not say a word against the Emerald gems generally, but it is a great pity that any Irishman should go to worship at Mr. Train's shrine, and thus repeat the old-world blasphemous fallacy, "It is the voice of a God, and not of a man The unworthy twigs then give us a piece of information which the ordimary reports of Train's lectures omit. They say :â Thy twenty-four inch head last eve Was crowned with the victor's wreath. Certainly he has a fine head, but it is scarcely poetical thus to state its measurement. Mr. Train is a man of culture, whatever else & is, and must laugh im. mensely at such balderdash as this. As railway travelling will now be on the increase it may be interesting to point out a new system which has been adopted in reference to the time-tables. Bradshaw's London Railway Guide" has made a valuable innovation on the old plan, in giving tabular and alphabetical arrangements of trains. The second plan is altogether new. It shows the traveller at a glance the times of departure from and arrival at places not ineluded in the tabular arrangement. For example, a person at King's Cross, wishing to go to any place, say by the Great Northern, or to any other place with which this great line can be connected, finds on the same page the times of departure and arrival, with the number of communications daily, the classes of the trains being also indicated. And for travellers coming up to London the same system is adopted. The complication of railway time-tables has long been a subject of jokingâand sometimes it has resulted in anything but a joke and though much of the laboured attempts to be funny on this subject have had no true foundation, still the difficulty of understanding many of the ordinary time-tables is so great that it is only fair to acknowledge a successfml attempt to lessen it. The Aeronautical Society intend having an exhibition next June, at the Crystal Palace. A better place could not be chosen, always presuming that the society has something worth seeing. In spite of the long list of failures, the numerous fatal accidents, and the very little progress that has been made in the science (if it be a science) of aeronautics, enthusiasts continue to come forward year after year. There was not long since a notice of application for a patent for a flying machine, or something of that sortâthe exact title esoapes meâwhich was to navigate the air by means of oails aDd rudders. Will this affair be exhibited ?

:PASSING EVENTS, RUMOURS,…

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----THE CLERKENWELL OUTRAGE.

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