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ro THE EDITOR OF THE ABERYSTWYTH…

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ro THE EDITOR OF THE ABERYSTWYTH OBSERVER. Sir,âIn the present inclement weather it may be If some use if you will give insertion to the follow- ng, cut from this day's Standard. Your obedient servant, 23rd Jan. PEYSTON SZIZZARS. FIRE-BALLS FOR MAKING FIRES. TO THE EDITOR. Sir,âOne of YQurcHrrcEpondents asks for infor- uttion about .f the fire-balls for making up fires, id how to get the clay, &c I can tell him how lings are managed near Milford, in Wales. A small gritty coal called "culm is got. I thiiikfroca Llanshipping, and mixed with the elay«*y mud (called slime) from the bed of Milford Haven, in equal parts. The mixture is still called culm. The culm costs about 8s. a ton, the slime and mixing about 4s., so that you have the mixed culm at 6s. a ton delivered at the water's edge. The culm ï. heaped up until wanted sufficient for use is then taken, damped, and kneaded into lumps the size of a large potato with the hands. These lumps are piled up in the fire-place, leaving a vent in the centre or top for a draught. This makes a capital fire, espe- cially for cooking. When the fire is made up for the night a lump of culm is placed over the vent, and the fire goes on smouldering; in the morning uncover the vent, and in a few minutes you have a cheerful blaze, and the kettle (left on the hob during the night) boiling. In some of the Welsh cottages j the fires have not been out for 30 years and more. I used to utilise the dust from the ordinary house coal in a. similar manner. Any clayey mud or clay, not too stiff, mixed with coal dust, will make excel- lent culm. I know it from experience. Indeed, I think it would be a great saving to reduce house coal to dust on purpose to make culm. I am, Sir, Yours obediently, j I enclose my card. G. j ⢠ECONOMY IN BURNING COAL. â â¢' I TO THE EDITOR. Sir,âIn Consequence of the appearance in yout columns of my letter to the Mayor of Hull many in- quiries have been made of me, personally and by letter, showing the interest taken in the simple suggestion of a thin plate of sheet iron laid on .the bottom of the fire-gate. I beg to inform yonr readers, nrst, that the plates are equally applicable to large and small grates. Secondly that the plates last a long time, mine hav- ing been in use seven years, and I see no reason why they should not last seven years longer. Thirdly, the cinders falling on the hearth, after poking the fire, should from time to time be placed on the are, as they contribute greatly, towards keeping it at an uniform red heat. Fourthly, the plate is specially useful in a kitchen grate, securing an excellent ruddy and uniform frontage Wrroasting and here also the cinders on the hearth are a very valuable addition to the fire. Lastly, after the fire has been once made up, bye-and-bye will be Seen (say, in about two hours' time) a hollow in the fire, caused by the combustion underneath. Then press down the top of the fire, and you have a second in excellent order; and so you go on, as may be necessary, adding as much fresh coals as may be deemed requisite. With myself a fire of average size, made up about ten or eleven a.m., lasts, with a few occasional fillips by way of pressing down or poking up, till half-past four or five p.m., without fresh coal. I find that these plates are rapidly getting into use everywhere and in a Hull paper just sent to me it is said, "the uniform testimony is that they answers admirably." With such a winter as this, and coalsâthe best at 33s. per tonâthe saving of one ton out of three, with increased warmth and diminished trouble, appears to justify me in thus trespassing on the space of your widely circulated paper. I am. Sir, Your faithful servant, Jan. 22. SAMUEL WARREX.

I TUUS AMOR—A PPEM OF SIMILES.(j…

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