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BREACH OF PROMISE— £ 2,000…

AN UNSUCCESSFUL MISSION.

OUR COTTON SUPPLY.

A PORTRAIT OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN.\

AN PORTANT DISCOVERY.

A SEA-SICK MILLIONAIRE.

TEA v. MALT.

AN ENCOUNTER WITH A TIGER.

HOW A SECRET WAS OBTAINED.

PARLIAMENT SKETCHED.

AN EXTRAORDINARY CASE.

HINTS TO WORKING MEN.

THE LAW OF GIFTS!

CHARQUI.

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CHARQUI. Cbarqui, the name by which dried beef is known to the South Americans, was speedily changed by the Enghsh sailors into jerked," hence any one who has read tales of buccaneers, or of the pirates of the West read tales of buccaneers, or of the pirates of the West Indian seas, is quite familiar with the name of jerked Indeed, the very name buccaneer is derived, it IS saId, from this beef, which was also called boucawed" meat. Familiar as we may have been, however, any time these twenty years with the name, the substance itself has been unknown in this country till very recently, when Mr. Madden, of 3, Leadenhall- street, London, seeing that it could be sold in England at 3d. per lb., conceived that it might be introduced here with advantage. The nature of the operation by which the beef is pre- served is such as to retain the largest possible amount of nutriment; it is cut from the bones in long strips, dipped in pickle, and then hung up to dry in the sun. By this means all the juices are dried up, and the meat which remains is said to contain 47 per cent. of fibrin, good corned beef having but 16 percent., and component! ° £ imPortant In on Monday, a large number of persons attended at the London Tavern, pursuant to invita- UOD, to partake of a variety of dishes made from th;s South American beef. Mr. Warriner, instructor of cookery to the army, was in attendance, and explained â the mode of preparing the meat and soups which were served out to those who had the good fortune to arrive before the supply was exhausted. Preparations had been made on a scale commensurate with the number expected to call, but about fifteen hundred people availed themselves of the invitations issued, and the consequence was that those who arrived late had but little opportunity of forming an opinion as to the beef or the cookery. The soups were excellent, and consisted of pea soup, vermicelli, Julienne and Bonelli, after partaking of which a good curry of the beef might be had. The mention of these dishes will serve to show that this meat, though possessing abundant nutriment, is deficient in the appetising quality, being in itself almost flavourless. It is, therefore, best suited for the foundation of diphes where the flavour is only that cf the condiments employed, ani for such purpose its remarkably low- price renders it a valuable acquisition to our markets. Mr. Warrin! r has devoted much attention to the proper utilisation of this new article of food, and specimens of several varieties ef portable soups made from it were exhibited. These soups may be made from the pre- paration in from five to ten minutes, at a sost of about 3d. per quart, and a man may carry the solid materials for a cuuple of gallons in his pockets. The meat, as imported, somewhat reminds us of a story we once heard, that gutta percha had been substituted for roast beef in a certain union workhouse to the great delight of the paupers. It is not quite so tough as good leather, and is about as salt as Newfoundland cod, but when properly soaked and boiled it is tender and insipid, much resembling the chips of meat which remain after a strong soup has been boiled from them. It contains, however, abundant nutriment, and when rendered palpable by proper condiments may be a good and wholesome article of food. Among those who nartook of the dishes were Miss Burdett Coutts, Sir J. Dalrymple, numbers of gentle- men connected with the metropolitan hospitals, the heads cf the large shipping houses, and a great number of persons interested in public institutions of various characters. The expense in preparing the soup from the meat as imported did not exceed 2d. or 2.J,d. per quart, including the cost of fuel and attendancef quart, including the cost of fuel and attendancef No .v that public attention has been called to this commodity, there seems to be every reason to expect that it will become a regular article of consumption, and if it should not be used in the way some might have wished, it will at least enter into the dietary of the nation in such sort as to leave a corresponding propor- tion of food free at a lower price than hitherto for the benefit of the working classes.

STOCK EXCHANGE SLANG.

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THE MARKETS.