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BREACH OF PROMISE— £ 2,000…

AN UNSUCCESSFUL MISSION.

OUR COTTON SUPPLY.

A PORTRAIT OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN.\

AN PORTANT DISCOVERY.

A SEA-SICK MILLIONAIRE.

TEA v. MALT.

AN ENCOUNTER WITH A TIGER.

HOW A SECRET WAS OBTAINED.

PARLIAMENT SKETCHED.

AN EXTRAORDINARY CASE.

HINTS TO WORKING MEN.

THE LAW OF GIFTS!

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THE LAW OF GIFTS! r In the Court of Common Pleas, an action, "Bourne v. Fcsbroke, has been tiled, and was as follows~ â â â The plaint's in this case was a young lady, 17 years of age, and her aunt, Susan Phillips, has lived for many years as housekeeper with Mr. Fosbroke, a gentleman of means. In 1853 the plaintiff went to see her aunt, and Mr. Fosbroke took a fancy to the child, and she remained in his house, he charging him- self with the cost of her keep and education. In lbG3 the aunt died, but the plaintiff still remained in the house of Mr. Fosbroke until be died, leaving the defendant, his brother, his representative. The plaintiff then left the house, but she claimed a watch, some trinkets, and some wearing apparel as having been given to her by her aunt. The defendant, however, refused to give them up, and the present action was brought to recover them. The case came on for trial before Mr. Baron Channell, at Leicester, when it appeared that the aunt was a married woman, though her husband had left her a month after mar- riage, and had never been heard of again until after her death. At the trial, the question was raised whether the aunt, being a married woman, had power to give her niece these things, and the result was that a verdici was entered for the defendant, with leave to the piaintiit to move to enter a verdict for herself for 251. > ubsequently a rule was obtained pursuant to this leave, it being contended that the articles given were part of a woman s paraphernalia," which she bad a right to dispose of; and, further, that the plaintiff being in lawful possession, the defendant, who was a mere wrongdoer, had no right to dispossess her. Cause was shown against this rule being made absolute. The Lord Chief Justice said that he was of opinion that the ruh) should be made absolute. He thought the plaintiff did not acquire .any property in these goods as against her aunt's husband; but still she o maintain this action against the defendant ac- cording to the rule that a person having quiet lawful possession, although not actually entitled to the property, could maintain an action against any wrongdoer who deprived him of it. In his opinion the plaintiff was in law in possession of these articles, although they were left in Mr. Fosbroke's house. J udg-ment for tbe plaintiff.

CHARQUI.

STOCK EXCHANGE SLANG.

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THE MARKETS.