Hide Articles List

17 articles on this Page

BREACH OF PROMISE— £ 2,000…

AN UNSUCCESSFUL MISSION.

OUR COTTON SUPPLY.

A PORTRAIT OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN.\

AN PORTANT DISCOVERY.

A SEA-SICK MILLIONAIRE.

TEA v. MALT.

AN ENCOUNTER WITH A TIGER.

HOW A SECRET WAS OBTAINED.

PARLIAMENT SKETCHED.

AN EXTRAORDINARY CASE.

News
Cite
Share

AN EXTRAORDINARY CASE. In the Court of Bankruptcy, in London, before Mr Com- im^oner G 'Ulburn, in "Re T. K. Baker," the bankrupt" apple 1 on Moadsy ID last week, to pass hia examination ⢠a..d for an order of discharge, when judgmeut was reserved, until Monday whenâ His Honour said this was a very extraordinary case, perhaps the most extraordinary that had ever came before him during his long experience in the court. The bankrupt was a draper lormerly carrying on a pros- perous business at Woolwich, and it appeared that differences having arisen with him and his wife, pro- ceedings in the Divorce Court were commenced by her and a decree for a divorce was in due time obtained, the bankrupt being ordered b pay the costs of the suit together with alimony at the rate of 201, per year. The bankrupt was determined that he would never satisfy the claims of his wife. To accomplish this object he sold his stock in trade, the lease of the premises where his business was carried on, and also two or three houses of which he was the proprietor, and converted the whole into money (about 1.500?.) He then proceeded to Dover, and thence to O.^tend, Wiesbaden, and other places on the Continent. From Geneva he wrote a letter, in which after describing the beauty of the scenery, he stated that he had lost money by specula- tions at Wiesbaden, and added that "if the ex Mrs B (meaning his wife) wanted any more of his spare cash she had better get it poon before he went through the court. Upon the bankrupt's arrival in England, he gave a very singular account of a loss which he said he had sustained. His statements were very conflicting and he furnished three distinct versions of the mode in which the Joss had oc- curred. The first of these was given to the au- thorities at the Bank of England, in order to induce them to allow interest upon the notes alleged to have been lost. The bankrupt stated that upon the arrival of the steamer at Folkestone, and as he was passing along the gangway, he took from bis pocket a cigar case containing notes of the value of 1,450?., and that being pressed forward by the crowd behind, he dropped the cigar case into the sea. A second account was given to the detective officers, Messrs. Hamilton and Brett, to the effect that the notes had been extracted from bis pocket, and he fnrni-hed the addresses of two men whom he charged with the theft. Upon inquiry, however, it was ascertained that the individuals suspected were persons of great respectability, upon ) whom not a shadow of suspicion could rest. A third version was that, passing along the pier, he suddenly stumbled, and that, turning round, he observed » person following him; he felt for his cigar-case and could not find it. Haviog referred to other glaring discrepancies in the bankrupt's statements, his Honour said, the question was whether the bankrupt had given a full, true, and sufficient account of his property so as to justify an application to pass his examination and for an order of discharge. The only asset stated in the accounts was an idle claim to recover the amount of the alleged loss from the Bank of England. Then, was it true that the bankrupt had sustained the loss ? That he ha.d the notes was quite clear. Were they in his possession upon his arrival at Folkstone, or had he disposed of them previously ? The statements made by the bankrupt were inconsistent with each other. The letter from Geneva furnished a clue to the motive by which the bankrupt was actuated. The Court was of opinion that the story of the alleged loss was a con- trivance for the purpose of defeating the claims of the wife, and that the evidence of the bankrupt was wil- fully untrue. Under tbe circumstances the further hearing would be adjourned sine die. Protection was granted for one month, to enable the bankrupt to appeal if so advised.

HINTS TO WORKING MEN.

THE LAW OF GIFTS!

CHARQUI.

STOCK EXCHANGE SLANG.

[No title]

THE MARKETS.