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BREACH OF PROMISE— £ 2,000…

AN UNSUCCESSFUL MISSION.

OUR COTTON SUPPLY.

A PORTRAIT OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN.\

AN PORTANT DISCOVERY.

A SEA-SICK MILLIONAIRE.

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A SEA-SICK MILLIONAIRE. The following is taken from a paper in Harper's NelU Monthly Magazine, entitled "John Jacob Astor â In 1832, one of his daughters having married a European nobleman, he allowed himself the pleasure of a visit to her. He remained abroad till 1835, when he hurried home in consequence of the disturbance in financial affairs canned by General Jackson's v. ar upon the Bank of the United States. The captain of the ship in which he sailed from Havre to New York has related to us some curious incidents of the voyage. 1\-1r. Astor reached Havre when the ship, on the point of Sailing, had every state-room engaged but he was so anxious to get home that the captain, who had commanded ships for him in former years, gave up to him his own state. room. Head winds and boisterous seas kept the vessel beating about and tossing in the Channel for many days. The great man was very sick and still more alarmed. At length, being per- suaded that he should not survive the voyage, he asked the captain to run in and set him ashore on the coast of England. The captain dissuaded hirn. The old man urged his request at every opportunity, and said at last, "I give you tousand dollars to put me aboard a pilot boat." He was so vehement and im- portunate that one day the captain, worried out of all patience, promised that if he did not get out of the Channel before the next morning he would run in and put him ashore. It happened that the wind changed in the afternoon, and wafted the ship into the broa t ocean. But the troubles of the sea-sick millionaire had only just begun. A heavy gale of some days' dura- tion blew the vessel along the western coast of Ireland. Mr. Astor, thoroughly p^nic-stri *ken, now offered the captain te thousand dollars if he would put him ashore anywhere on the wild and rocky coast of the Emerald Isle. III vain the captain remon- strated. In vain he reminded the old gentleman of tbe danger of forfeiting hifl insurance. »" Insurance exclaimed Astor, can't I insure your ship myself ?" In vain the captain mentioned the rights of the other passengers. In vain he described the solitary and rook-b >ui'd coast, and detailed the difficulties and dangers which attended its approach. Nothing would appease him. He said he would take all the responsi- bility, brave all the perils, endure all the conse- quences only let him once more feel the firm ground under his feet. The gale having abated, the captain yielded to his entreaties, and engaged, if the other passengers would consent to the delav, to stand in and put him ashore. Mr. Astor went into the cabin and proceeded to write what was expected to be a draft for ten thousand dollars in favour of the owners of the ship, or his agent in New York. lie handed to the captain the result of his efforts. It was a piece of paper covered with writing that was totally illegible. What is this ?" asked the captain. "A draft upon my son for ten waa the reply. But no one can read 1 ii ^e3' 8on know what it is. My hand trembles so that 1 cannot write any better." "Bat," said the captain, you can at least write your name. I am acting for the owners of the ship, and I cannot risk their property for a piece of paper that no one can read. Let one of the gentlemen draw up a draft in proper form; you sign it, and [ will put you ashore." The old gentleman would not consent to this mode of proceeding, and the affair was dropped. A favourable wind blew the ship swiftly on her way, and Mr. Astor's alarm subsided. But even on the Banks of New- foundland, two-thirds of the way across, when the captain went upon the poop to speak a ship bound for Liverpool, old Astor climbed up after him, saying, "Tell them I give tousand dollars if they take a pas- senger." Astor lived to the age of eighty-four.

TEA v. MALT.

AN ENCOUNTER WITH A TIGER.

HOW A SECRET WAS OBTAINED.

PARLIAMENT SKETCHED.

AN EXTRAORDINARY CASE.

HINTS TO WORKING MEN.

THE LAW OF GIFTS!

CHARQUI.

STOCK EXCHANGE SLANG.

[No title]

THE MARKETS.