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BREACH OF PROMISE— £ 2,000…

AN UNSUCCESSFUL MISSION.

OUR COTTON SUPPLY.

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OUR COTTON SUPPLY. The Manchester Chamber of Commerce has held its annual meeting and by its able and indefatigable resident, Mr. Henry Ash worth, we are furnished with f exposition of the present state of our c tton supply, very fully confirming our own anticipa- tions three years ago that neither India nor any other country would supply the loss of tbe produce of the Southern States of America, whether as to quantity or quality (says the Examiner in an article from which we quote the following.) InlSGO, when Amcrica was still supplying us with cotton, our consumption amounted to 1,083,000,000 lb, valued at 34,000,000?, and last year we consumed little more than one-half as much, at a cost of 80,000,0001., or, in other words, for half the quantity and for less than half, the quality, we pay 4f> 000 OOOl. more, that is, we paid within tenmilJion of double the interest of our National Debt! India is, at present, the source of our chitf supply. In lH60 it furnished us with 214,000.000 Ih. weight, of the value of 3,600 0001, and l*st year with 513,000,0001bs for which we paid 40,000,000?. Our Iudiau cotton co^t us in 1860 about 3|J. a pound, and last year it cost us nearly 18Jd. There was, therefore, a bounty paid to the Indians of nearly 15d. on every pound they pro- duced, or a total brunty of thirty-six and a half millions sterling in a single year. Has this very handsome premium improved the quality of the Indian cotton ? By no means, on the contrary, it is rather worse than it was. Before the cessation of the American supply, it was only their bad befot that was brought to the English market, but now good, bad, and indifferent are brought, and there ia even an aggravii- tion of the foul and fraudulent practices of former times. There is not even any reliable evidence that the cultivation of the article.haa increased in India the additional supply being made up of abstractions from the domestic consumption of the Indians, and of the whole of the quantity ia former times sent to China, valued at 3,°0.°.OOOl.. The great probability then, is that India has not increased the amount of its cotton cultivation, and the certainty is that it has not improved in quality, being BUll the short dirty brittle: staple it alwkys wkr, d mandmg additional labour in manufacture. Although India has done nothing of this, other countries, evln Thus w<?f?ml fn/ Undt;r. ,decPot5c governments, have, inrl r. ,wBich was always an importer, «apan, which neither imported nor exported, srnd- 1DfS^Ui St yeelr 30,000.000 It weight, the cotton ot the last-named country being more valuable than the Indian by 9 per cent. Even Siam, which had never sent cotton to Europe, exported last year to the weight before jf 2,500 000 Th as we find by the Bangkok Gazette, for Siam, like Japan, has its English newspaper. Letit not be said that this arises from any incapacity in the soil and climate of India to produce cotton, for they are perfectly well adapted to do so, and as evidence of this the President of the Manchester Chamber of Com- merce tells us that gome Indian cotton, although small in quality, of double the value of the ordinary staple, was imported last year. India, as we have frequently had to remark, pro- duces excellent indigo, sugar, and silk, but all these only through the application of English skill and capital, and not a pound of them is to be got without these aids, nor will they ever be. It will be the same with cotton until its culture is helped by the same appliances for the Hindus, left to themselves, are, in industry and agricultural skill, far below both Chinese and Japanese. Sufficient proof of this is the supply of cotton received by us from Japan, to say nothing of the vast superiority of the sugar of the Chinese to the native sugar of India, and the still greater superiority of the raw silk of both nations. As, then, the quantity of raw cotton of India is small in proportion to what it ought to be, and in quality the very worst that comes into the English market, notwithstanding the yearly missions we are laying out in the hope of improving it, we come to the inevitable conclusion that there must be something rotten in the administration of our Indian domain. And this we fancy we can trace very distinctly to the rMrZlaU°! of the Couilcil of the Indies to maintain T1 mo <⢠an finance, and to exclude Europeans from the fee simple of the land, the only SfStoiT g a C°Untry °f g°0d aAd abund^ cotton.

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AN PORTANT DISCOVERY.

A SEA-SICK MILLIONAIRE.

TEA v. MALT.

AN ENCOUNTER WITH A TIGER.

HOW A SECRET WAS OBTAINED.

PARLIAMENT SKETCHED.

AN EXTRAORDINARY CASE.

HINTS TO WORKING MEN.

THE LAW OF GIFTS!

CHARQUI.

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