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BREACH OF PROMISE— £ 2,000…

AN UNSUCCESSFUL MISSION.

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AN UNSUCCESSFUL MISSION. A Washington dispatch thus describes the result of Mr. Blair's mission to Richmond ;â It is now definitely..set led that Mr. Blair's mission has been an entire failure, and that he is not to wear the honours of a great pacificator. l'ilr. Blair went to Richmond, confident that he should be able to in- augurate negociations whose end would be the termi- nation of hostilities and restoration of the union. He returns satisfied that at present there is no hope of a peaceful solution of existing difficulties. He found division and wrangling among the rebel leaders but they are so distrustful of each other that none dare to assume the responsibility of making advances or agree- ing to terms which would lead to peace. Davis is environed with enemies who watch his every motion, and are ready at first indication of a disposition to accede to any possible terms of settlement; to spring upon and oter whelm him. For this reason he could offer no terms, expect a precedent recognition of com- missioners as representing the Confederate Govern- vernment; or he was willing to negotiate without an actual recognition provided an armistice of from 30 to 90 days was granted. Neither of the propositions could, of course, receive a moment's consideration, and so he was informed. ⢠Findin¡l all efforts to accommodate matters unavail- ing, Mr. Blair has returned to this city, and his labours as a peacemaker are ended. Nothing now remains but a vigorous prosecution of the war until the army of Lee is destroyed, and then peace will come, not by negociation, but by the disintegredation of the rebel Government. The rebels are determined to make one last effort, by the conscription of negroes, and a more vigorous enforcement of the conscription of white men, to change the current of disaster which has so steadily set against them of late. Their hopes of recognition have not al- together failed them, and they are encouraged, from the action of our Congress in relation to the French occupation of Mexico, to believe that Franee will soon recognise them as an offset to the hostility displayed towards the new government of that country by the United States. All these arguments are used to keep the rebel Congress and the people from despairing of ultimate success, and they have the effect desired for the present. It is authoritatively stated to-night that Mr. Blair is preparing a letter, addressed to Horace Greeley, de- tailing his experience as a peace negotiator, and ex- plaining the causes of his failure, and showing that there is no hope of an immediate peaceful settlement of the war. General Singleton has not returned yet to this city, although it is understood that he has come within our lines from Richmond. His political friends are quite disappointed at his utter failure to bring the rebels to a peaceful frame of mind. Peace men are said to be plentiful in Richmond, but Reconstructionists do not as yet dare to avow them- selves.

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