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TO C 0 RLiESPU N D E X T S.

S fl r a I Jf it t c IL i…

I ABERDARE POLICE COURT.

REJOICINGS AT FERNDALE.

. ABERDARE LOCAL BOARD OF…

ALLEGED WILFUL MURDER AT RHYMNEY.

MOUNTAIN ASH LOCAL BOARD.

UNVEILING A BUST OF MR. R.…

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UNVEILING A BUST OF MR. R. H. RHYS, J.P. In order to mark in some enduring form their high sense of the valuable services rendered by Mr R. H. Rhys, chairman of the Merthyr Board of Guardians, the gentlemen who have been associated with him in the work of poor-law administration have set up in the board-room at the union workhouse a marble bust of this most useful public servant, and at a meeting of the subscribers held on Saturday the bust was formally unveiled. It has been executed by Mr Thomas Brock, A.R.A., one of the most rising sculptors of the day, and it possesses un- doubted artistic merit; indeed, it is a. work so faithful to the life that it does infinite credit to the high reputation which, by his great skill, Mr Brock has acquired. It is mounted on a pedestal, which stands on a ledge at the eastern window of the board-roomâa magnificent apartment for the erection and possession of which the guardians are indebted to Mr G. T. Clark, of Dowlais, a former chairman and it adds considerably to the ornate appearance of the building, which had already been graced by an excellently truthful bust of Mr Clark and another of Sir John Guest. In opening the proceedings, Mr Clark said that on no occasion did he ever remember to have felt more pleasure-a pleasure which he was sure was felt by all present-than in thus being able to publicly acknowledge the long- continued public services of his friend Mt Rhys. No man agreed with his neighbour upon all points,:and taking a broad and liberal viewof what Mr Rhys had done, he thought he might look upon that respectable assembly as a proof that they were ready to put their stamp of approval upon his principles-principles which had been well tried, and which, on the whole, had had a brilliant success. (Applause.) It was said that a prophet was not regarded with honour in his own country, but he thought the manner in which they, his friends and neighbours, had recognised the services of Mr Rhys during his long public career, showed that this was one of the exceptions to the rule. This acknowledg- ment was not confined to his own district, or his own part of the country only, where he was best known, for he (Mr Clark) was able to say of his own knowledge, from sitting with him at other places, that there was no man in the com. mission of the peace within Glamorganshire who was more looked up to upon points con- nected with the Government of the county (save and except their excellent chairman of quarter-sessions) than Mr Rhys was, and he did not think that there was anyone, except the chairman, who had done so much to keep the finances of the connty in good order. (Applause ) There was no man more able to expose any tendency to jobbery, and no man more ready to join in making a liberal grant of money, if he thought the purpose for which it was wanted was really a good one and advantageous one. Mr Rhys had done much to -.alleviate the financial pressure upon the county. (Applause.) He hoped that the bust might long continue to adorn the room, and he trusted that;future guardians would look at it and remember that this was a man who presided over the board, and tempered in no ordinary degree justice with mercy. The bust was then unveiled, and Mr Clark, upon viewing it, several times exclaimed Admirable," other gentlemon being equally demonstrative in the expression of their opinion upon its remarkable likeness to the living original. Mr Rhys, in reply, said he could hardly find words in which to express the feelings he labeured under at that moment. He felt very grateful to Mr Clark for the too flattering-Cno, no)âterms in which he had spoken of his services to the public. He had always tried to do his duty in every position in which he had been placed, and he regarded their assembling there that day to pay him this compliment as a proof that they, at all events, had appreciated those seivices. (Hear, hear.) He trusted that during the short time he might remain at the board he should continue to discharge these duties on the same principles, and in the same manner as he had always tried to do heretofore. His object in life, ever since he lost his sight, at all events, had been to strive to reduce pauperism to a minimum without being unjust to mankind. Mr James Lewis rose to express regret that Lord Aberdare had not been able to be present. His lordship had taken a very great interest in the work. He moved:â That a vote of thanks be tendered to Lord Aberdare for the kind assistance he has afforded to the subscribers, also that a letter be sent to Mr Brock, conveying our satisfaction and appreciation of the very skilful way in which the bust has been executed." (Hear, hear.) Mr T. Williams, J.P., seconded the motion, and it was carried with acclamation. Mr Clark said ho was sure nothing but the dreadful weather they were having would have prevented Lord Abdrdare from coming over. It was not through any want of feeling, for they all knew that he was always very happy to come when he could be of use. (Applause.) Mr Jenkin Matthews proposed, and Mr D. P. Davies, J.P., seconded, a hearty vote of thanks to Mr Clark for his presence, the pro- position being carried amid cheers. Mr Clark, in replying, referred to his many pleasant associations with the board.

MOUNTAIN ASH.

[No title]

VALE OF NEATH RAILWAY.

PAWNING A PAIR OF TROUSERS…

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