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DEAN STANLEY on CHARLES DICKENS.

PROFESSOR JOWETT, M A., ON…

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A HUSBAND'S LIABILITIES.

ANNIVERSARY OF HER MAJESTY'S…

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ANNIVERSARY OF HER MAJESTY'S ACCESSION. On June 20. three-and-thirty years ago, the reign of the present Sovereign of England began. Shortly after two o'clock in the morniug of the 20th of June, 1837, the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Lord Chamberlain left Windsor for Kensington PaUce, where the Princess Victoria wag residing wi h her mother, to inform her Koyal Highness of the Kirg'tt dtath. They rea -hed Kensington Pal. ce about five, and with Bome difficulty roused the porter at the gate. This functionary, apparently itmorant of the rank of the distinguished visitors, and knowing nothing of the business upon which they had come, kept them waiting for some time in the court-yard, and then turned them into one of the lower rooms, where they remained until, ringing the bell, the Lord Chamberlain desired the attendant of the Princers to inform her Royal Highness that they requested an audience on business of importance. After another delay, and another ringing to inquire the cause, the attendant was summoned, who stated that the Princess was in such a sweet sleep that she could not venture to disturb her. The Archbishop of Canterbury gravely replied We ara come to the Queen on busmen of S'ate, and even her sleep must give way to that!" It did; and in a few minutes her Majesty came into the room in a loose white dress and shawl, her hair falling over her shoulders, her feet in slippers, teara in her eyes, but perfectly collected and dignified. Lord Melbourne was immediately sent for, and a Privy Council was summoned to assemble at Kensington at eleven o'clock in the forenoon. At that hour the Queen, with the Duchesa of Kent, entered the Council-chamber, and the Lord Chancellor admi- nistered to her Majesty the usual oaths, binding her to govern the Kingdom according to its laws and customs. She first received the hcmage of her uncles, the Dukes of Cumberland and Sussex, the Queen with admirable grace rising from her seat and preventing them from kneeling. The Cabinet Ministers and Privy Councillors then took the oaths of allegiance and supremacy the former surrendered their seals of office, which her Majesty returned, and Ministers kissed her baud on re-appointment. A declaration was drawn up and signed by all present, acknowledg- ing faith and constant obedience to our only lawful and rightful lieg- Lady Victoria, by the grace of Gcd, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Defender of the Faith." Her Majesty then spoke to fie following enect :â The severe and afflicting loss which the Dation has sus- tained by the death of my beloved uncle has devolved upon me the duty of administering the government of this empire. Th's awful responsibility Is imposed upon me so suddenly and at so early a period of my life, that I should feel myself utterly oppressed by the burden were I not supported by the hope that Divine Providence, which has called me to this work, will give me strength for its performance, and that I shall find in the purity of my intentions, and in my zeal for the public welfare, those resources which usually belong to a more mature age and a longer experience. I place my firm reliance upon the wisdom of Parliament and upon the loyalty and affection of my people. I esteem It a'so a peculiar advantage that I succeed to a Sovereign whose constant regard for the rights and liberties of his subjects, and whose desire to promote the amelioration of the laws and institutions of the country, have rendered his uime the object of general attachment and veneration. Educated in England under the tender and enlightened care of a most affectionate mother, I have learned from my infancy to respect and love the constitution of my nalive country. It will be my unceasing study to main- tain the R-formed religion as by law establisoed, securing at the same time to all the full enjoyment of religious liberty and I shall steadily protect the rights, snd promote to the utmost of my power, the happiness and welfare of all classes of my people. A generation has passed away since these words were utt-red, eight Parliaments have been called to the counsels of the Sovereign, and twelve Ministries have ruled in Downing-strcet. Abroad, all conti- nental thrones, from the vast emi);r, of Russia to the smallest of the German grand duchies, have changed their occupants. Amid the stormy times of conflict and revolution in Europe, the throne of the Queen of England has remained unshaken, for the loyalty and affection of her subjects have been its basis. Amid the strife of contending parties at home, and throughout the thirty-three years which separate the Premiership of Lord Melbourne from that of Mr. Gladstone, Queen Victoria has ever fulfilled the duties of a constitutional monarch, placing her firm reliance upon the wisdom of Parliament," and never failing to give effect to the expressed wishes of her people.

BALLOON ASCENT IN A THUNDERSTORM.

A STRANGE STORY.

THE PJSTING OF TRADE CIRCULARS…

DINNER TO MR. CHARLES MATHEWS…

THE INTELLIGENCE CF THE TELEGRAPHS.

BETTER TIMES AT LAST.

THE EDUCATION BILL. I

THE ARCHBTSHOP OF CANTERBURY…

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FRIGHTFUL RAILWAY ACCIDENT.…

Utisttllanmis Jnklfijcnce,