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DEAN STANLEY on CHARLES DICKENS.

PROFESSOR JOWETT, M A., ON…

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A HUSBAND'S LIABILITIES.

ANNIVERSARY OF HER MAJESTY'S…

BALLOON ASCENT IN A THUNDERSTORM.

A STRANGE STORY.

THE PJSTING OF TRADE CIRCULARS…

DINNER TO MR. CHARLES MATHEWS…

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DINNER TO MR. CHARLES MATHEWS IN AUSTRALIA. (From the Australasian, April 2.) On Monday evening Mr. Charles J. Mathews, comedian, was entertained by the Yorick Club, at a dinner, given to celebrate his arrival in Australia. The affair took place at Scott's Hotel, the premises of the club not affording the requisite accommodation. Nearly 70 members were present, and a large number were prevented from attending by the necessity which postponed the affair from Saturday to Monday. Toe chair was taken by Mr. G. W. Rusden, one of the trustees, who, after the usual loyal toasts, proposed the health of the guest of the evening, which was re- ceived with enthusiasm. Mr. Charles J. Mathews rose to respond amid a storm of cheering, which lasted for several monMnt", when a fresh burst of hurrahs made the room ring again. He said :â I:> Gentlemen, to say that I am flittered by the compliment that I hive been paid to-night, and by the many c'vil things that your president has hVlshett upon me, would but very ill f xpress my gratification at this gathering. I expected to meet with kindness and politeness, but I was not prepared for the truly hearty and friendly reception that has greeted me. I do not knowâ1 cannot hncy that 1 am in a strange laud (cheers), or that I am btinx received by strangers (no, no). Enr) thing seems as familiar as if 1 had been here ad my life, and every one treatB me as if I hud known them from childhood (vehement cries of So you have. and cheers) From the moment I .>⢠et foot on shore and walked lip Collins-street, I se*med to be lnstantlj rscognUed as readily as if I had bsen in Liverpool or Manchester, aud every shop- keeper welcomed ma as though I had been only parted trom him last week. This is what gladdens a man's heart- perhaps tickles his fancy-but makes him feel at home at once (great cheering). It makes a man ask why it is that this meeting has been put off so long, how 111 Is that I have neglected such friends who have expea ed m* s.) mmy yearr, ami are so glad to see me at last ? (cheers). I am to blame, acknowledge that frankly, and I can only say that I will never do so any more (laughter) As to the voyoga that I looked forward to with so much horror-why, it was non- sense (laughter and cheering). What I sarcastically called before parting a mere pleasure trip has turred out to be such an one indeed. What with music, dancing, private theatricals, glorious weather, and no letters to answer (laughter), what could a man desire more? Since my arrival in Melbourne my chief labour has been shaking hands and listming to pliasact tl injs said by pleasait people. That I find no hard task Of course I had to resoond to the usual questionsâ"Are you not surprised at Melbourne?" "How do you like our town ?" "Have you seen our Town-hall, our Parliament Housesâand our eaol ?" (much laughter). Of course these were necessities that I had to comply with, and followed by the usual remarks and encomiums upon Sydney Harbour, and winding up with Only to think thirfy-five years ago the white man had not set his toot here (laughter and cheers). Of course I had to confess that I was not surprised. It was what I expected. I knew it all beforehand. Why. Mel- bourne is as well known and appreciated in London as London is in Melbourne (hear, hear). No, I was not BUT. prised. After all, 35 years is a good long time you kiow. With plenty of money a great deal cm be done in 35 ye K. I was myself fully developed long before I was 35 (laughter for some time). Nobod- was surprised at me (renewed laughter). When Melbourne gets to be my age, think what it will be then (laughter and cheer.-). That will be somethii g worth witnessing. I only hope I shall be here to ste it (cheers, and cries of We hope so too") In the mean- time I iutend to avail myself of all the enjoyments that offer. I hope in return to merit the hospitality and kindness I have received, and if in getting into work I only afford you the entertainment you expect, why the gratification will he mutual (cheers). You have taken me on faith to-night (en- thusiastic cries of "We know you of old," and cheers) It shall go hard, indeed, if I do not come up to your expecta- tions. I will do my best, and no man can do more. As to Mr. Rusden's calling me by my Cdrntian name, that Is the greatest compliment that can be conferred upon me. I never felt more pleased than when coming from the opera the other night, the mob called out Bravo, Charley (cheers). Gentlemen, I will not detain you any longer. I thank you very sincerely, and I belt to propose Prosperity to the Yorick Club," (long and repeated cheering).

THE INTELLIGENCE CF THE TELEGRAPHS.

BETTER TIMES AT LAST.

THE EDUCATION BILL. I

THE ARCHBTSHOP OF CANTERBURY…

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FRIGHTFUL RAILWAY ACCIDENT.…

Utisttllanmis Jnklfijcnce,