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Family Notices

SECESSION AGAIN!

REFORM! SHALL ABERDARE HAVE…

TOPICS OF THE DAY.

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ABERDARE POLICE COURT.

WRITING FOR THE PRESS.

EDUCATION OF THE WORKING CLASSES.

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER…

THE REV. DR. PRICE.

-«MOUNTAIN ASH.

To THE EOrToa OF THE " ABARDARB…

To THE EDITOR OF THE" ABEBDARE…

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To THE EDITOR OF THE" ABEBDARE TIMES." SIR,âI happened to be at St. Fagan's School- room on Monday week last, and I was exceed- ingly pleased with all that took place. The competition between the children evidently shewed that there had been great pains taken, able management, and great teaching powers used, otherwise the children, from five years and upwards, could not have made so great a pro- gress. I was delighted with the entertainment. It is a great boon to the public that there are so many National and British Schools in the parish of Aberdare, where the children are well and successfully taught. Ladies and gentlemen of any neighbourhood cannot testify their good wishes to the poor and hard-workiug men better than by preparing places where their children may be taught reading, writing, and, above all, taught their duty to Q-od and to their neigh- bours, for this is the great road to wealth and fame. I must say this much for the great em- ployers of labour in our county, they do not wish to be enriched by the sweat of their labour- er's brow and wasting sinews, and leave him in heathen darkness. Show me a man who is op- posed to the education of children, then I could point, sir, to one who is anything but a friend to the lower classes, aud such, sir, are the general sentiments If us working men. There is too great a tendency in the world to forget this great truth, that all have proceeded from the same stock. Many of the ancestors of our great princely merchants and extensive iron masters were nursed in the cottage, and the transition in many cases is easy to follow. We must never forget that the poor man is the foundation of the great social fabric. Of what value would the extensive landed estates and large balanoe at the banks be to a prince if he had no retinue of servants or labourers to be at his bidding, and cultivate his soil? Ho would soon sink to the humbler profession of being a labourer himself. Though the working man is in the lowest social stratum, it would be dangerous to pierce that stratum too deeply, lest, the great subterraneau reservoir would be reached. Look at the house on the brow of yonder hill, with its beautiful turrets, fine lawn, and extensive park, whose owner has a thousand sails whitening the world's occan-huw came he by that? By the toil of the poor man. Look again at another mansion, which has as many windows as there are days in the year, and whose owner can boast of mil- lions. The poor man made him a millionaire. Tiien let the rich and the great forget not the sons of labour. I fear I have trespassed too long upon your valuable space, but 1 hope you

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