^ C^F/"CgWSTJTpplOPLlT|1878-01-26|The Cardigan Observer and General Advertiser for the Counties of Cardigan Carmarthen and Pembroke - Welsh Newspapers Online
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-,-¡'-., ,'.-..;1 LONDasr…

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PARLIAMENTARY INTELLIGENCE.…

'DEGREES - LD.

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A FOURTEEN-LEGGED FLTTPDJPR.

; THjli LOMBARD-33A

FELIX OF THE CAFE DU HELDER-

FURIOUS DRIVING IN NEW YORK.

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mu TC)N.-

OUR FRONTIER WAR.

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^ C^F/"CgWSTJTpplOPLlT

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â A private letter'from Fhilippopolia.giT^ an abso- lutely appalling account of theitate <>T thjs fugitives, lescribijiir n^hers, mad frpm^Teap/thrjWing their -hilcfceti oufcSjf? the carriage.^jbwa-y/One mother deliberately killed three children to-e^ve them from juffering. People so overcrowd the roofs of carriages that numbers fall off and are crushed beneath the wheels. There are sick wounded at Matzka. who have b<^jn»»tttatMi"^oj»gh whether by Russians or Bul- parnink ls*n ot kiiown .*â Major de Win ton, as represen- tative of the Turkish Compassionate fund, is working indefatigably to relieve tbe sufferers on their arrival here. The English A-ubassador il.'Mio actively en- gaged, hence the money, which is korely needed, is sure to be weU employed. C^F/"CgWSTJTpplOPLlT At a;8pe<jiaf Couqjcif hk<| aJUkhe Se|a*i|t^t<f!Vc4m- frciSe?!: of all fctfe MihistVrJ antr an ex-Grand Vizier, tb,w. b jf$g))residinz, tho discussion turned chiefly on thk tfvf&ifio of â Constantinople anJ the measures necessary to maintain public order if peace jiegotia- tioiS'failPfi. /"TKfJqgh .ih§*<^>l £ |i>->bfot^"on p°ace as fo~5e likely to create disturlmnces if forced to ccntiniw tp epdure the miseries of war, the Sultan wjis tola tqat QfTOOO mei^ could be furnished to defend â OeBitskBtittople and" he promised to put himself at ,thfir head -bu!; h^ is not the-sppt qf-ipan really to do tfcls.jrfte held sinxilafrlilaogrfagij Vout going to Adrianople, the defence of which, the Council decided to'Abindon. ⢠'â â 1 'â â v 1 THE INSDRREOTIONARY MOVEMENT IN k" ..eRB'fB; k (A in Crete, oiTTihe'31st ult., says: Asl wrote to you on the 16th, the Chrisjtjan OommiMiOn of .JBettimo pro- ceeded to the village ot Epi^o^pi^-wiware tbey njwt the e as oUb other ioce cided to y ok, 0 W 14,M imo, to repreaent them in any assembly which might be fWed* j orf j thi^TW armed Christians' assembled and elected their representatives. A'a:'Jboir' i fts!' tlié 4le<rt50tt>'1 'HadJi^fiMlsheAy â¢'all' the "g their gans. shouted- -and declared -that- they- wantedâliberty,' ger under the yoke' suuu a \xuvvrniunub, J. uu tuectcu reprcscut#- jtiv^ left lor Vafe', ^^eftheVWlfi/^fieS tEe others1 -Ot/ApOTSOBina, Spitkii, «an« CjtdoLa,* t(J form a; Provisional Government. This step, which is con- sidered by all the inhabitants as an insurrectionary nVl ydt ttje s,«)nrbfti to pro^eeii to the mountains. lhe Senior asked fee leading Ottomans this *eek to ,tr j and perpuade\ *heir- co^reimonists to that they Jfoiiid only return when the governor had guaranteed j;fie petition df] the Christians would not be ^nted, and had by force dissolved the Christian ^Smbly on the mountains. The governor after- ?wke,d' the, phtf&iKtM to ^uiet, ^nd said mktt<ts wcrtfld be arteina^d.' They answered Oniiless the;:i Gov^hithfent.' tbofc info con- r?fftiph'; JhiBir t^' guaradttoe"' the future. "The governor left .^morning for the country, where, I am told, he 80 and meet the Christian assembly. During his in ^e^im^r be-re veriyissipn to-some Obris- of\he saburbe to bring', thflir movable property Aout 2000 packages came to-day. the those ta whom they .belonged arrived, before Sates,' the Ottomans, with guns and knives, V^T^ted them from entering, threatening if they th to do sp to fire at'thiem. No one on the part of la ^^oritiea presented himself, and the Turk9 de- c that they did not recognise either the Sultan or h«ya^ ftn(j woui(j punish with death those who ventut^j to enter the city. Mr. Trifilli, her Britannic p consular agebt, and Mr. ;E&matnuel t chancellor of the Austrian consulite, went t0 spot to ascertain the fact, and, if possibly, the excitement; but on their arrival the d them, and with knives in hand pur- 8Uev»;uem ^or .distance, Great excitement Pr 7^in the to?rn, and all the consu&r ag^nta have proteaV and MB»rt the facta to their resp*c- tive conguiSi ABANDONMENT OF ADRIANOPLB BY THE -» TURKS. military movement -on' the par^ of the â¢ans has compelled the Turks td abandon ris*10^6' their second capital. The Turkish ga j?.°f the place retired with its arms and bag- gflS'e* iJjsmii Paaha, the ^governor; of the town and the co^torof defences,had preyiously left with the 9dtn ritie8- evacuation was caused solely by mili- t»ry °ece«8itj, and was not effected by negotiation. £ ke advarlce upon AdrianOple was coosider- ably e aJCcl after the capture of the Shipka Pass, aDa thither had subsequently to be gained movements. General Skobeleff's de- J-' "*vhicfci took Hermanli, marched a distance of 0l!F.English miles in forty hours. "Vast Stores of &'?a^ni^0n had been accumulated at Adrianople wbic^1 blew up as they left, and they also get 10 the Eski-Serai, or Old Palace of the abandoning Adrianople the Turks lose an amount 0f costly war material, in- cluai^g heavy guns, The fortifications of the place ^ft^igned when it was intended to form an army 0 WJO men for the defence of the town, and fewer an 6O OQQ men wouid not suffice to hold the A %GLANi) AND RUSSIA. Tbe 3 eJtusse contained an el aborate article upon the war an relations of the neutral Governments to it ftn â â¢ssia. With reference to England, it states outbreak., of war it was incumben<jv-on the -Baaaian^fi^vernment to consider^ "Interesta of thialj, country, and thai J tot Queen's Government, prompted by la efojg intention, explained x the Bri- t'sh lD which might becom^Nmvolved in the war, t|juct waa received in a I'riebffiSkspirit, pro^ifceq' j.0 respect those intepests, haa regpecte<1 eia, roa(j to India bj the Suez ana ^Jgjpt remains aa heretofore the ex- clusive uODoajnoi jjugi^j^and in regai^d to this point there is 5°nJ?e ^adow of a Russian menace. As to Constantinople, Igussia is now, aa øhè has been hitherto, of OPIkion that that is a question re- served for -B,ropo.. and she still maintains that under no circumstances that city to Belong to any one of the Great -Po^ra. Further on it SjSd^that Russia baa Perfect right to conclude pfeace With Turkey direc"J» Vhile at time respecting the interests of .'r States, and particularly o £ 3ogi«nd, twhoee ,1Il4ereBtit-is thafrno^hange-mffiBgtate of things "in Bast shall injure her route to India or her East. cw. Aim^NOftp. In th'e T,ur«sli capital the arrival of Suleiman Pasha in defend Adrianople is no longer reckoned up0D»_*i>^ all preparations are being made for the ^va«uRt^ of the place. The worka thrown up round the citi. it is true, are said to be wwM de- vised, tolerably cOtnplete, and armed with over 200 heavy guns, but tr*jopa are wanting to defend th'e ex- tensive lines* "<iur thousand men aloqe wauW be needed. for the 8ep*ice of The guns, while £ 0,000 are regwded as ^ftijrawja to mah the detaeheti "bCrtha and form a sufficient reserve. There was a pfen. it may be for collecting a reserve Army of 150,000 men in Adrknople, and the scale of the works was designed in Prokrtion. RUSSIAN LOSSES AT THE CAPIURE OF THE 8IPKA PASS. In an official, from Shipka, of the 14th instant, it is stated aat notwithstanding the severity of the weather health of the troops is excelled The number of Turkic guna taken at the capture of the Shipka Pa" waa Seventy, and the number^! pri- soners 25,000, among vehomsfore-io The Russian loss, on h/and, waa very great, which may be taken to sho^ least the genuineness of the fighting. T IVO Rellerals, one colonel, and or e lieutenant-colonel were wounded, nineteen" officers killed and H6 wo"?<lecl, 1103 men killed, and 4246 wounded» Making a total of 5464. This is a much larger numb8P than the first accounts suggested. Anoth6r deepen describes the advance of the Russian forces In the west, in which Samakov and Trojan's Gats were taken. ENGLAND, AUSTRIA> AND THE PORTE. The Agence H*vas P«bliah es a statement from Con- stantinople that Austria, like England, has declared to the Porte it cannot allow peace to be made without her acquiescence as one of the signataries of the Treaty of Paris, but nothing has here transpired about any such fresh intimation on the part of this Govern- ment, which would be but a repetition of what was said already 1Q.1'a telegraphic reply to the Turkish Circular. -^V^ria, therein, as may be remembered, while declining ag a neutral to mediate between the belligerents, reserved the right, as one of the Guaranteeing Powers, to intervene for the pro tection of her own interests and have a voice in thQ final settlement. When that voice is to be raised will naturally depend on the courae of the negotiations between Turkey and Russia; but at a time when these negotiations have not even begun, it does not seem likely that Aus'ria will raiae her voice merely to re- peat what she has declared once already. If, there- fore, Austria really found herself impelled to say something at this juncture of affairs, it certainly was not exactly what she is supposed to have uttered.

WAR ITEMS.

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