A ROMANTIC STORY.|1878-01-12|The Cardigan Observer and General Advertiser for the Counties of Cardigan Carmarthen and Pembroke - Welsh Newspapers Online
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TELEPHONE TALKING ACROSS THE…

THE GUILDHALL LIBRARY.

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THE FATAL FIRE AT NEW YORK.

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THE BRAHMAPOOTRA.

THREATENED GENERAL KAFFIR…

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DISTRESS IN SOUTH WALES."

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GUN ACCIDENTS AND THEIR CAUSES.

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MR. J. ANTHONY FRQUDE, M.A.,…

OUR AUSTRALIAN COLONIES.

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PROVINCIAL FREE LIBRARIES.

A ROMANTIC STORY.

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A ROMANTIC STORY. The Paris correspondent of the Daily Telegraph says: The Valdrome affair, which commenced as a society scandal, and ended with the glaring publicity of a court of law, has had a curious and romantic epilogue. In the first instance, Madame de Valdrome, the widow of the last Home Minister of the Empire, lost her case, the guardianship of her child was entrusted to the uncle, and by him the boy was placed in charge of the Dominican Brothers at Argueil. On Dec. 31 a Dominican father brought the little boy to wish his mother a happy new year. Madame de Valdrome retained her child with her, kept the Dominican father for several hours in an ante- chamber, dressed her son as a girl, entrusted him to i some friends who were starting for abroad the s ime If day, and then returned home to prepare for her own flight. At last the Dominican lost patience, found that the boy was gone, and rushed off to inform his j tutor, M. de Valdrome, of what had passed. M. de Valdrome communicated with the police. Madame de i Valdrome's house was surrounded and she herself was Y watched, the agents even following her to church. There after her prayers, she entered the sacristy as t i Madame de Valdrome, and, taking advantage of her theatrical experience, left it as a little, bent, old woman, well enveloped in a large mantle. One of the agents of the police even sprinkled her with holy 1 water as she departed. Once in the street, Madame de Valdrome of course found a cab awaiting her, drove to the station, and safely reached her little son beyond the frontier. One can hardly believe such a romantic story, but it is only another proof that truth is stranger than fiction. We find, however, Madame de Valdrome consulting such very material and unro- mantic lawyers as Maitres Alloa and Betolaud before taking the bold measures in the success of which public sympathy will go with her.

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