THREATENED GENERAL KAFFIR RISING.|1878-01-12|The Cardigan Observer and General Advertiser for the Counties of Cardigan Carmarthen and Pembroke - Welsh Newspapers Online
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TELEPHONE TALKING ACROSS THE…

THE GUILDHALL LIBRARY.

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THE FATAL FIRE AT NEW YORK.

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THE BRAHMAPOOTRA.

THREATENED GENERAL KAFFIR…

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THREATENED GENERAL KAFFIR RISING. The latest intelligence from the Cape is much less favourable than that received by the last two mails. In the colony a very uneasy feeling prevails; there is excitement at Port Elizabeth and Grahamstown, and the Home Government thinks it advisable to send out a regiment of infantry and a battery of artil- lery without delay. The cause of appre- hension in the present case is partly the chief KrelÃŹ, who has returned with his tribe to the Transkei, to try and recover their territory. To meet the danger of an apprehended exten- sion of the war, every regular soldier has been sent to the front. Further, the Zulu King, Oetewayo, now appears disposed to give trouble. This potentate has occupied a district on the Transvaal frontier to which he pretends a claim that is not recognised by the British Government. The dispute is one which we took over with the territory of the South African Republic. Sir Bartle Frere has requested Cetewayo in a friendly manner to retire from the country he has occupied, but hitherto he has shown, no disposition to do so. Possibly the dispute may still admit of an amicable settlement; but it would be a serious matter to have our power defied even with only a temporary appearance of success by a chief whose lead the great body of Zulu Kaffirs would be inclined to follow. We need not dwell upon a subject the importanse of which has been fully exhibited by Lord Carnarvon in his despatches to the Governor of the Cape in support of his policy of confederation. The Kaflirs are in an over- whelming majority, and they have been for years in- vesting their spare cash in rifles and ammunition. Sir Bartle Frere has declared the British settlements to be ia danger, and he is no alarmist. We may be sure that he would not have called for reinforcements if they had net been really required, and can only hope that they will arrive in time to enable him effec- tually to maintain the rights of this country without landing it in a general Kaffir war. By the arrival of „the mail from the Cape of Good Hope we learn that public meetings have been held at Port Elizabeth,Graham's Town, King William's Town, and East London, at which resolutions were passed urging the Gevernment to adopt a more energetic policy, and pointing out the necessity for a special session of Parliament. Sir Bartle Frere, in replying to a deputation, admitted that the situation was one of extreme danger, but said that if the colonists sup- ported him he had every hope of carrying things through without peace being disturbed within the colony. Rumours of disaffection among several tribes prevailed, it is stated, but there appeared to be no foundation for them, except the excitement ampng the natives consequent upon Kreli's movement. j Ç'r

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DISTRESS IN SOUTH WALES."

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GUN ACCIDENTS AND THEIR CAUSES.

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MR. J. ANTHONY FRQUDE, M.A.,…

OUR AUSTRALIAN COLONIES.

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PROVINCIAL FREE LIBRARIES.

A ROMANTIC STORY.

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