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TELEPHONE TALKING ACROSS THE…

THE GUILDHALL LIBRARY.

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THE FATAL FIRE AT NEW YORK.

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THE BRAHMAPOOTRA.

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THE BRAHMAPOOTRA. The Abbé Deagodins, a French missionary traveller, .in a paper recently contributed to the Paris Geo- graphical Society, makes some additions to our still very imperfect knowledge of Tibet, and especially of the middle course of the Brahmapootra. An old Lama told the Abbe that in his youth he had travelled much and visited nearly the whole of Tibet. He had fol- lowed the great river from its source, in or near the lakes of Too-ma pang, in the western part of the Pro- vince of Nogare, the most western of Tibet, and in making his pilgrimages he arrived at the frontiers of the wild tribe of the Lhopa. The Lama said that some days to the east of Lassa the river turns towards the south, making along bend, and traverses the Tibetan district of Hia-yul, a rich and well-peopled district just to the north of Lhopa. The river enters the country of the wild tribe and winds its way among steep and rugged bare rocks, without roads, and which can be passed only by means of wretched ladders made of lianas. After a certain course among the Lbopa, the river falls over a high reck into a valley which is not known. T height of the fall is so great that the Lama said t m",de him giddy to look down. At this place, he said the river is almost as considerable as the Kin-sha-kiatg at Bathang. The details which the Lama gave the Abbe leave him in no doubu as to the accuracy of the information, which confirms what he has learnt from other sources. Everybody in Assam knows of the fall of the Brahma-Khound, a regular place of pilgrimage. The Abba's confrere, M. Bernard, has often spoke to him of a fall marvellous for its height, the volume of its water, and the basin which it has hollowed out for itself. The position assigned by M. Bernard on the south of this fall and that assigned by the Lama on the north induced the Abbe to believe that the fall of the Brahma- Khound is simply the fall of the Tar-kiou-taang-pe, which becomes the Brahmapootra, and which is navi- gable almost immediately after the fall. The Lama affirmed on several occasions that the Yar-kiou-tsang- po does not reach the Mishmis, but disappears more to the west among the Lhopa. This brave Lama, as the Abbe calls him, gave the latter much other geogra- phical information, but at present he gives only what he has been able to confirm from other sources, though he believes the Lama to be quite trustworthy. In going from Sha-mou-to, on the Lan-taan kiang, to Lassa, by the great official route, after having passecl the Lo tee kiang, we come upon the principal ports of Lo rong djong, Sho pan to, Lah (in Tibetan Larego ), and Kiamada. To the south of Sho-pan-to and Lali, atabcat two days' journey, the traveller leaves on the left ttie south) the independent Principality of Po-zul (in Chinese Pomi). This Principality recognises the Emperor, and is governed directly by the third Ambassador of Lassa, who bean the title of I tsin; it does not in the least recognise Tibetan authority. It is divided among four indigenous chiefs, who are almost independent in their respective terri- tories, and who take council together only on the common affairs of the tribe. The country is said to be very rich and difficult of access, surrounded as it is on all sides by high, steep mountain. The red Lamas are here very numerous, and robbers more so, and they often make expeditions beyond their frontiers. Leprosy is said to be widespread. Po-zul borders on the west the Tibetan country known under the name of Kongbou, and of which Eiamda is the chief town or village. This country extends almost to Lassa, is thickly peopled, and very rich, but leprosy is here also extremely prevalent, Another singular peculiarity of this country is that the proportion of females is much more considerable than that of, males in the statistics of births. The country of Po-zul does not reach on the south as far as the Himalayas, from which it is separated by a strip of country governed by Lassa. The eastern limit of Po-zul is the western slope of the chain of mountains which descends from north to south on the right bank of the Lo-tse-kiang. The Lama's statement as to the middle course of the Brahmapootra seems to confirm the surmises of Cap- tain Godwin Austen.

THREATENED GENERAL KAFFIR…

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DISTRESS IN SOUTH WALES."

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GUN ACCIDENTS AND THEIR CAUSES.

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MR. J. ANTHONY FRQUDE, M.A.,…

OUR AUSTRALIAN COLONIES.

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PROVINCIAL FREE LIBRARIES.

A ROMANTIC STORY.

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