Hide Articles List

18 articles on this Page

TELEPHONE TALKING ACROSS THE…

THE GUILDHALL LIBRARY.

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

CAFFBE ATHO CITIES.âAmong the incidents of the war South African journals have made special mention of the deaths of Sub-Inspector Carl Von Hohenan and Constable O. Evans, killed in action by the Galekas. On the order to retire being given Von Hohenan having (so it is said) assisted Evans into the saddle, was vaulting up behind when he was shot in the hip, and both men rolled to the ground. The enemy were too close at hand for escape. A gentleman who witnessed the recovery of the bodies of the policeman who fell in the action, says: "Evans had eighteen assegai wounds, mostly on the back. All the bodies were stripped, but Evans's coat was so full of holes that the natives left it. Sub-Inspector Von Hohenan had long boots on, and finding them difficult to get off, they severed the feet at the ankle joint and took them away in the boots. One of the unfortunates was found -scalPect-6 thing, we believe, unheard of in any pre- vious Oaffre war. All the bodies were horribly muti- lated?' A correspondent writes" Many horrible thiags. hanna been seen by our volunteers over the Kei, but, perhaps, the most revolting sight was a dog lying gorged by the side of his dead master, upon whose body it had been feeding from day to day. Numbers of anecdote* are teld us of the faithfulness of the dog; how he would lie by the dead form of hia once master, and keep all intruders at bay until the breath leaves his devoted body. The question naturally rises, does an animal degenerate by contact with a savage race ? Galeka dogs were frequently seen eating dead Galekas, and our men shot them for revolver practice." A contribution is made to the list of eventa on which the fate of battles has hung: It is stated among the Galekas that whenever' a commando of Caffres took the field, a hare was invariably seen leading the army, and hencethe disaster which always befel the natives. A dqgtor, it waa said, was consulted, who accused Lindinxolts of being a wizard who sent the hare fo? the purpose of destroying the army. The natives say that Lindinxowa has been put to death for this." REGISTERED LETTERS AND MONEY ORDERS. âThe changes in the system of registering letters and in the scale of charges for inland money ordera has come into operation. The registration fee has been reduced from 4d. to 2d., exclusive of the ordinary charge for postage, and special registered letter en- velopes, bearing a 2d. stamp, have been prepared of different dimensions. These will be sold at all post- offices and by rural messengers, who are now autho- rised to register betters. In the event of a re- gistered letter be; >g lost while passing through the post, the department will, under certain regula- tions, make good the value of the contents up to £2. The scale of charges for inland money orders has been altered by raising the rate charged for orders under 10s. from Id. to 2d., and the rate for orders of 10s. and under £1 from 2d. to 3d. The scale of charges for inland money orders is now as fellows: For sums under lOa., 2d.; 10a. and under£2, 3d.; £2 and under £3, 4d.; £3 and under £4, 5d.; £4 and under d65, 6d.; £5 and under £6, 7d.; £6 and under £7, 8d.; £7 and under £8, 9d.; £8 and under £9, lOd. £ 9 and under £10, lid.; £10, Is. STBTTCK OFF THE REGISTER.âIn the course of the month of November 118 sailing vessels and 11 steamships were struck off the Register of British Shipping, but of these two have been subsequently re- stored. Of the total of 129 ships, 50 were registered at English ports, 15 at Scotch, 12 at Irish, 7 at Welsh, 4 at ports in the Channel Islands, and 38 at Colonial or foreign ports. The ages of the ships vary from 77 years to five months. Not many were of very large tonnage, 58 being under 100 tons and 26 betwden 100 and 200, only nine being over 1000 tons. The causes assigned for the removal from the register were: Stranded, 15; sold to foreigners, 13; unsea- wortby, 3 foundered, 7; broken up, 18 lost, 21; sunk after collision, 5 wrecked, 20; abandoned, 9; mwaing, 2; gold as wrecks, 3 sold under judicial decrees, 2; to be broken up, 1; registered at other 1 ports, 2; condemned, 2; abandoned on fire, 1; burnt, 1 1; sunk, 1; and 3 converted into lighten or hulks, â i;-yr jf f -⢠⢠-i ⢠â v » 3 A, -⢠w

THE FATAL FIRE AT NEW YORK.

[No title]

THE BRAHMAPOOTRA.

THREATENED GENERAL KAFFIR…

[No title]

DISTRESS IN SOUTH WALES."

[No title]

GUN ACCIDENTS AND THEIR CAUSES.

[No title]

MR. J. ANTHONY FRQUDE, M.A.,…

OUR AUSTRALIAN COLONIES.

[No title]

PROVINCIAL FREE LIBRARIES.

A ROMANTIC STORY.

[No title]