THE GUILDHALL LIBRARY.|1878-01-12|The Cardigan Observer and General Advertiser for the Counties of Cardigan Carmarthen and Pembroke - Welsh Newspapers Online
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TELEPHONE TALKING ACROSS THE…

THE GUILDHALL LIBRARY.

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THE GUILDHALL LIBRARY. It will be recollected that, as on experiment, and in deference to the wishes of many large firms in the City, the Corporation of London determined that their library in the Guildhall should be open te the publie for twelve months on every evening during the week, except Saturday, until nine o'clock. Mr. Overall, F.8.A., the librarian, reports that the total "number of readers availing themselves of the addi- tional privileges granted by the Corporation had been 49,4S4-namely, those staying at five o'clock, 14,738, and those afterwards arriving, 34,696. The average attendance each evening had been 201 readers, and, taking the months separately, it appeared that the maximum occurred on" an evening in February, 259, and the minimum in June, 170. Thus, as might be expected, the public make more use of the library in the winter months than in the summer. The class of readers using the library and reading-room in the evening would appear to be, for the most part, young men engaged in mercantile pursuits during the day. The literature consulted might be thus classed: (I) History, topography, heraldry, and biography; (2) Philosophy, science, and the fine arts; (3) Poetry, drama, snd fiction; (4) Voyages, travels, and geography; and (5) Classical and English literature, and belles- lettres. There was not a single instance of any one m* juring the books entrusted to them. The works of the most popular historians had been duplicated, and a purchase had been made under the bequest of the lata Sir David Salomons of a liberal selection of works upon science and the fine arts. The staff arrangements made by the Library Committee had worked very satisfactorily. The actual cost of the evening opening had been £1277 for the year. In 1874 the total number of readers and visitors was 173,559; in 1875, 192,716 in 1876, 220,257 and in the first six months of this year 121,619—the daily average attendance for these years being respectively. 603, 724, 767, and for the six months in this year, 816. In conclusion, the librarian stateø" that, judging from the rapid increase in the number of readers, and the usefulness of the library in all its branches since it has been opened by the Corporation as a free library, and including the evening opening during the past year, he was certainly of opinion that as the facilities afforded, and the great value 6f the collection in the library became more generally known, the results in the future would be even more favourable. The Library Committee having carefully considered the librarian's report on the details of the working of the library, and having regard to the very satisfactory evidence as to the extent to which the public had been benefited by the evening opening, recommended the Court to authorise its continuance and permanently sanction the arangements which, during the experimental period, had been found to provide so effectively for the care, maintenance, and supervision of the library. This recommendation has been adopted.

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THE FATAL FIRE AT NEW YORK.

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THE BRAHMAPOOTRA.

THREATENED GENERAL KAFFIR…

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DISTRESS IN SOUTH WALES."

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GUN ACCIDENTS AND THEIR CAUSES.

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MR. J. ANTHONY FRQUDE, M.A.,…

OUR AUSTRALIAN COLONIES.

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PROVINCIAL FREE LIBRARIES.

A ROMANTIC STORY.

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