.WHICH IS THE BEST PAVEMENT?|1878-01-12|The Cardigan Observer and General Advertiser for the Counties of Cardigan Carmarthen and Pembroke - Welsh Newspapers Online
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LONDON CORRESPONDENCE.

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FOREIGN AND COLONIAL. },

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A NEW TRADE BETWEEN AMERICA…

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RUSSIA, TURKEY, AND ENGLAND.

MR. FORSTER, M.P., AT BRADFORD.

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THE WAR. \i1 m a

WAR ITEMS.

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WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

.WHICH IS THE BEST PAVEMENT?

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WHICH IS THE BEST PAVEMENT? The judges of the group containing exhibits of materials used in paving, at the late Philadelphia Ex- hibition, have made an interesting and important report on the subject, and, as the latter is one that closely concerns the public, the conclusions of the juages are given at length, as follows Wooden pave- ments have had a fair and patient trial in the United States, and are now very generally con- demned as to streets subjected to heavy traffic. They are slippery in wet weather, and are very perishable from their inability to resist either the wear of the street traffic or the causes of ordinary decay. As to durability, assuming each of the pavements to be excellent of its kind, and the foundation to be solid, so that no ruts and depressions, except those produced by actual wear, can be formed, tough stone blocks will possess the longest life of the three, and wooden blocks the shortest, ssphal te lying between the two, and very near the stone. As to first coat, the order of cheapness is given thus: First, wooden blocks in America; second, asphalte, and third, stone blocks, and as to cost of maintenance and repair the order is thus placed: Economy of yearly maintenance, inclu- sive of first cost, good stone stands first, asphalte second, and wood third. In facility of cleaning the order is first, asphalte, second stone, and third wood, whether the cleaning be done by sweeping or washing. Stone is, of course, the noisiest pavement, and the dif- ference between the slipperiness of the wooden, asphalte, and stone pavements is not very great, supposing the street to be kept reasonably clean. The deductions of the jury are as follows: In respect, therefore, to the comfort and convenience of persons using the street as well as those residing upon it, the order of merit would seem to be asphalte first, wood second, and stone third, for all streets except such as are habitually crowded with heavy and busy traffic, in which case stone must be placed first and asphalte third. The hygienic objec- tions to a pavement of granite blocks are, first, its constant noise and din, which exert an in- jurious effect upon persons suffering with nervous diseases, and especially upon i nfants and all classes of invalids; and, second, its open joints, which collect and retain the surface liquids, and throw off noxious vapours and filthy and unwholesome dust. Exceptions to wood may be made upon the same grounds, and, in addition to ■;hi8, the material itself is subject to inevitable and •ften to early decay and decomposition, in the process f which poisonous gases and noxious miasma are lit free. M. Fonssagrives, professor of hygiene i the medical school at Montpellier, France, epresses the deliberate opinion that a city wth a damp climate, paved entirely with wood, would b<tome a city of marsh fevers. He also says, in spaking of asphalte pavements, that the absence of dut, the abatement of noise, the omission of joints- peinitting a complete impermeability, and thus pre- vening the putrid infection of the sub-soil—are among theprecious benefits realised by asphalte streets." CoEidered, therefore, with respect to the health of the peo]le, asphalte stands conspicuously first, stoiwi^ secod, and wood third in the order of value meri.—Philadelphia Enquirer.

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