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- THE TRANSVAAL.1

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PARIS FASHIONS.

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PARIS FASHIONS. Point de riz and vieux point d'Alen^on are being corked, jibe former on galoons, and the latter on fine linen and other fabrics used for the decoration rather than the trimming of heavy silk toilettes. Point de riz is an imitation of grains of rice, a favourite article in the code of fashion just at presont. It is executed with bright glossy silk, and with short white bugles the latter are preferred on white faille. A beautiful ball dress has been ornamented with bands of this work, while the fringes employed at the edges of the tunique and sleeves were long- eared silver wheat. Pink and blue rice are also worked, but the effect is not the same. Rice-tulle, rice-paper fans, and rice modesties are likewise the names given to very dead white materials, be they silk, paper, or crepe-lisse. Before describ-ng -the vieux point d'Alrn^n there is still something to be Raid about the new toilet-powder, called poudre deriz su bismuth, now used to excess. An effort has been m*de to rtvive the fashion which formerly existed of powdering not only the person and wig, but those velvet facings which came closest to the face anti throat, in order to impart to them a certain softness. This was, even in an age of extravagant research, a short-lived fashion, and the rtivivnl bas not been welcomed but, on the other hand, bismuth mixed with all the powders used for the ekin is subject to much contes, tation as concerns its ultimate hygienic effects. Two camps are dhidtd on the point, one upholding that ladies are ruining tbeir health with the particles of arsenic contained in the powder, others maintaining that bismuth is not prejudicial. Ladies on the Conti- nent could rot do better than keep to plain fecule de pomme de terre, which is easily perfumed with a little iris or violet. The old Alencon stitch, formerly executed only on thelace of that name, is now employed on linen in imi tation cf mediaeval cloths, kerchief-borders, &c. Old Alencon is totally different from modern. The web was formerly uneven and the patterns were in high relief. They were medallions, portraits, and even animals of great minuteness. A piece of imitation of the antique reproduces the old style very perfectly, It is a fiehu for the bosom showing fern branches for the ground-work, over which run a few hares in close texture. But a more perfect imitation is a cluster of detached azaleas entirely made of old Alencon stitch, and mounted, like artificial flowers for the hair. Galoon-embroideries have originated a pretty fashion for ball dresses. A wide band of tulle is worked with flowers or the initials of the wearer in various designs. It iq put on crossing from the right shoulder over the bosom, and fastening low down under the left arm. This kind of scarf bears all the aceeasoriea for a ball-room toilette, such as the fan- hook, ivory-tableta, handkerchief, and bouquet. Day and visiting toilettes are at present of a very elabe- rate description. Sleeves arc fanciful, being slashed on the front of the arm, and the slashes being lined and twisted over to show the contrasts between the upper and under part. Waists are busqued and peaked, especially the latter for full dress. Much lacing is fashionable; even linen collars and cuffs are laced on, and sometimes with coloured silk, but square collars and euffs are preferred. The full-dress hat continues to be either a white Rubens or a golden cloth Marie Stuart capote, of which the edge is a row of cut beads. Very rich and curious are the knick-knacks on velvet and faille bonnets, the prettiest being initials, large hammer- shaped pins, and swords and daggers. The fashion for exotics and exotic foliage is declining. At recep- tions in high circles, evergreens and lauristina are 8referred. Violets and monthly roses are worn in le belt of blouse costumes. Skunks and ourson fur loek well with artificial flowers, but nothing suits chinchilla and sable so well as lace. The front width ot dresses assumes the heart shape preferably to the tablier-ie., a piece of velvet much eapitonne, or of brocade, or damasse, is cut out and trimmed in a full-length heart figure, and is, more- over, fastened with ribbon-loops down the centre. The profusion of Venetian glass beads and bugles is quite extravagant. Boots are worn in gay colours. Opera caps are now the prettiest head-dresues. Rich Oriental tissues are made up for caps.

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